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Features

May 2013

A Burke for our time

by Charles Hill

He was an eighteenth-century Irish statesman, but Edmund Burke still has plenty to say today.


Edmund Burke as painted by James Northcote

A Burkean event took place in New Haven not long ago when two distinguished leaders at Yale proposed to the Proprietors of the Grove Street Cemetery, before a standing-room-only crowd of townspeople, that to tear down the cemetery wall would “create an inviting and open atmosphere” for passersby.

The cemetery is the oldest municipally incorporated burial ground in the country, older than Père-Lachaise in Paris. Eli Whitney, Noah Webster, Roger Sherman, and ...

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Charles Hill, a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, is Brady-Johnson Distinguished Fellow at Yale.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 31 May 2013, on page 9

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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