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- John O’Sullivan


September 2013

Against aesthetics

by William Logan

Part of the burden of being a critic means that you should reject Aesthetic Statements.

Artemision Bronze, a statue depicting either Zeus or Poseidon    

"Good sir, how many angels may jig upon the point
       of a needle?”
"The answer, friend, would be metaphysical, and
       you must inquire of Aquinas.”
"But what of the dance itself?”
"That would lie within the physics, and you must
       ask Aristotle.”
"And whether the jig be good or bad?”
"That must be aesthetical, and of aesthetics ’twere

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William Logan's new book of criticism, Guilty Knowledge, Guilty Pleasure (Columbia), has just been published.

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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 32 September 2013, on page 20

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The Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity
On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism.
The Duranty Prize is named after Walter Duranty, the New York Times Moscow corresponded in the 1920s and 1930s who whitewashed Joseph Stalin’s forced starvation of the Ukrainians (the Holodomor) and many other aspects of Soviet oppression. Duranty was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for his efforts. It has never been revoked.
Audio copyright Ed Driscoll,

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