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December 2013

Bernard Berenson revisited

by Marco Grassi

On the art historian Bernard Berenson's life and influence

Art historian Bernard Berenson (1865–1959) at Villa I Tatti  

An amusing story used to circulate in Florence in the late summer of 1944, a few months before the Allied armies of General Clark pushed the Germans northwards to ultimate defeat. Bernard Berenson, who had been in hiding for over a year, was finally able to walk again along the picturesque country lanes of Settignano that he knew and loved so well. On the first day out, a United States Army vehicle stopped alongside the diminutive, bearded, and impeccably attired gentleman. A G.I. leaned out and, in dreadful pidgin Italian, asked for directions. Mr. Berenson obliged, but naturally in the subtl ...

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Marco Grassi is a private paintings conservator and dealer in New York.

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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 32 December 2013, on page 9

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The Wadsworth Atheneum reborn

by Marco Grassi

On the newly renovated Wadsworth Atheneum.

Donatello & friends at the Duomo

by Marco Grassi

On “Sculpture in the Age of Donatello" at The Museum of Biblical Art.

Piero di Cosimo in Washington

by Marco Grassi

“Piero di Cosimo: The Poetry of Painting in Renaissance Florence” at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.

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The Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity
On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism.
The Duranty Prize is named after Walter Duranty, the New York Times Moscow corresponded in the 1920s and 1930s who whitewashed Joseph Stalin’s forced starvation of the Ukrainians (the Holodomor) and many other aspects of Soviet oppression. Duranty was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for his efforts. It has never been revoked.
Audio copyright Ed Driscoll,

Introduction to The Kennedy Phenomenon
Roger Kimball introduces The Kennedy Phenomenon, a conference presented by The New Criterion on Tuesday, November 19.

The Kennedy Phenomenon: "Watching the Kennedy Train-Wreck"
Roger Kimball reads Peter Collier’s paper on oft-overlooked unsavory details of the Kennedys' lives. Much of the paper is drawn from Collier’s book, coauthored with David Horowitz, The Kennedys: An American Drama.