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Features

December 2012

Caro up close

by Karen Wilkin

On “Caro: Close Up,” at the Yale Center for British Art.


Table Piece CII, 1970, painted stainless steel, 29 1⁄2 x 80 x 34 inches, Yale University Art Gallery, Katharine Ordway Fund

The Yale Center for British Art, Louis Kahn’s last project, completed after his death in 1974, is one of the great modernist buildings, both lean and sumptuous, a paradigm of sensitive proportions and luxurious minimalism. With its sequence of “rooms” around an atrium, its sky-lit “great room” hung with enormous Stubbses, its exquisite orchestration of suave concrete, steel, and pale oak, and, above all, its floods of light, the building feels less like a museum than a wholly contemporary, remarkably splendid English country house. It was this domestic quality that prompted a visiting British scholar, ...

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Karen Wilkin is an independent curator and critic.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 31 December 2012, on page 28

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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