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March 2007

D'Souza goes native

by Scott W. Johnson

On Dinesh D'Souza's controversial new book, The Enemy at Home: The Cultural Left and Its Responsibility for 9/11.

Dinesh D’Souza was an early editor of The Dartmouth Review, the conservative student newspaper. He earned a reputation as an enfant terrible before he graduated from college. In his tenure at the Review, D’Souza brilliantly tormented the liberal college administration that presented him with the perfect target. Whatever his earlier attainments, he established himself as a writer of substance with his 1991 book Illiberal Education: The Politics of Race and Sex on Campus, a critique of political correctness and multiculturalism. Intensely reported, the book was full of astute commentary and analysis. It justly won the applause of such knowledgeable observers as the eminent historian Eugene Genovese, who celebrated the book in a New Republic cover story.

In his subsequent career as an author and controversialist, D’Souza has followed the path he started down in Illiberal Education ...

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Scott W. Johnson is a Minneapolis attorney and contributor to the Power Line Blog.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 25 March 2007, on page 4

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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