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Letters

May 2013

Houston, we have a problem

by Robert Conquest

There is an error, involving controversial figures in our culture, arising from changes made to my piece in your April issue—“Clive James’s Singing Ceremonies”—after I approved final galleys. I originally wrote, and approved for printing, the following sentence:

As Norman Moonbase I figure, along with Kingsley Amis (Kingsley Kong) and—from the North—Philip Larkin (Philip Lawks), in his 1976 mock epic Peregrine Prykke’s Pilgrimage Through the London Literary World.

This has been altered to read:

As Nor ...

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Robert Conquest's latest collection of poems, Penultimata was published in June by Waywiser Press.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 31 May 2013, on page 80

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The New Criterion

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Singing ceremonies

by Robert Conquest

On the impressive new collection from Clive James.

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