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Theater

January 2013

I, bureaucrat

by Kevin D. Williamson

On Glengarry Glen Ross, Channeling Kevin Spacey, and The Anarchist.


Al Pacino in
Glengarry Glen Ross; photo by Scott Landis.

A bunch of dodgy real estate and questionable business dealings, untenable fiscal positions, a Darwinian struggle for scarce resources, and, somewhere offstage, an executive so detached from reality that he treats the human race like a kid with an ant farm: What took so long to arrange a revival of Glengarry Glen Ross? (Or another revival, the last one having been in 2005.) You’d think this would have been under way since the fourth quarter of 2008, perhaps with Dick Fuld cast in the role of the hapless Shelley “The Machine” Levene.

Rather than one of those real life sad sacks, we have Al Pacino as the saddest specimen among a very sad collecti ...

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Kevin D. Williamson is the theater critic for The New Criterion and the author of The End Is Near and It's Going to Be Awesome: How Going Broke Will Leave America Richer, Happier, and More Secure (HarperCollins).


more from this author

This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 31 January 2013, on page 49

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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