Ayaan Hirsi Ali. (Photo: EPA/OLIVIER HOSLET)

We have often had occasion in these pages to remark on the irony that the “free-speech movement,” which began in 1964 in the tumult of Berkeley, has over the years mutated into something close to the opposite: an anti-free-speech movement. It is not at all uncommon, on our nation’s campuses, to find academics decrying academic freedom in the name of a putative higher virtue. Consider, to take just one example, the Harvard professor of French who opined at an “anti-racism” conference that “professors should have less freedom of expression than writers and artists, because professors are supposed to be creating a better world.”

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