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October 2013

Machiavelli’s enterprise

by Harvey Mansfield

Machiavelli's philosophical musings on truth are just as important as his work on politics.


Portrait of Niccolò Machiavelli by Santi di Tito  

Five hundred years ago, on December 10, 1513, Niccolò Machiavelli wrote a letter to a friend in Rome describing one day in his life as an exile from Florence and remarked casually that he had just completed writing The Prince. This momentous book, together with its companion, the Discourses on Livy, neither published until after his death, announces an enterprise affecting all human beings today: the creation of the modern world.

Machiavelli is famous for his infamy, for being &ldqu ...

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Harvey Mansfield is a Professor of Government at Harvard University. 


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 32 October 2013, on page 4

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism.
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Audio copyright Ed Driscoll, www.eddriscoll.com.


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