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Art

November 2012

Mark Rothko: the decisive decade

by Karen Wilkin

On “Mark Rothko: The Decisive Decade, 1940–1950,” which opened at the Columbia Museum of Art, South Carolina, on September 14, 2012 and remains on view through January 6, 2013.

Mark Rothko’s so-called “classic style” works, with their hovering rectangles of insubstantial color, are among the best known and most passionately admired of abstract paintings, as easily recognized and readily parodied as Jackson Pollock’s poured tangles and, it seems, far more beloved. But Rothko didn’t paint the first of his “classic style” compositions until late in 1949, when he was forty-six. (Born Marcus Rothkowitz in Dvinsk, Russia, in 1903, he died, a suicide, in New York in 1970.) When he began the series that would preoccupy him for the rest of his life and define him as an artist, he had been painting for a quarter of century and exhibiting for more than twenty years; he began to study with Max Weber at the Art Students League in 1925 and was included in his first New York group show in 1928. The floating rectangles that are now synonymous with Rothko’s name were not the result of a sudden de ...

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Karen Wilkin is an independent curator and critic.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 31 November 2012, on page 42

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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The Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity
On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism.
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