Sign in  |  Register

The New Criterion

Quite simply, the best cultural review in the world
- John O’Sullivan

Features

May 2008

The age of educational romanticism

by Charles Murray

On requiring every child to be above average.

This is the story of educational romanticism in elementary and secondary schools —its rise, its etiology, and, we have reason to hope, its approaching demise.

Educational romanticism consists of the belief that just about all children who are not doing well in school have the potential to do much better. Correlatively, educational romantics believe that the academic achievement of children is determined mainly by the opportunities they receive; that innate intellectual limits (if they exist at all) play a minor role; and that the current K-12 schools have huge room for improvement.

Educational romanticism characterizes reformers of both Left and Right, though in different ways. Educational romantics of the Left focus on race, class, and gender. It is children of color, children of poor parents, and girls whose performance is artificially depressed, and their academic achievement will b ...

This article is available to subscribers and for individual purchase

Subscribe to TNC (Print and Online editions)

Subscribe to TNC (Online only)

Purchase article credit and clip this article

If you already have an account login first

Charles Murray is the W H Brady Scholar at the American Enterprise Institute.


more from this author

This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 26 May 2008, on page 35

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

http://www.newcriterion.com/articles.cfm/The-age-of-educational-romanticism-3835

E-mail to friend


The New Criterion

By the author

Future tense, IX: Out of the wilderness

by Charles Murray

On major artistic accomplishments.

Belmont & Fishtown

by Charles Murray

On diverging classes in the United States.

You might also enjoy

Guilt trip: Versailles, avant-garde & kitsch

by Roger Kimball

John Maynard Keynes’s revisionist history of World War I has had enduring—and harmful—consequences.

The minister of paradox

by Gary Saul Morson

The complicated, often conflicted, life of Alexander Herzen.

Divide and conquer

by Marco Grassi

Summer exhibitions in Florence and Verona reconsider the work of Pontormo, Rosso & Veronese.

Most popular

view more >

Subscribe to our newsletter!

* indicates required

Events

November 12 2014

Friends and Young Friends Event: Book Launch Party with Andrew Roberts


Webcasts

The Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity
On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism.
The Duranty Prize is named after Walter Duranty, the New York Times Moscow corresponded in the 1920s and 1930s who whitewashed Joseph Stalin’s forced starvation of the Ukrainians (the Holodomor) and many other aspects of Soviet oppression. Duranty was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for his efforts. It has never been revoked.
Audio copyright Ed Driscoll, www.eddriscoll.com.


Introduction to The Kennedy Phenomenon
Roger Kimball introduces The Kennedy Phenomenon, a conference presented by The New Criterion on Tuesday, November 19.


The Kennedy Phenomenon: "Watching the Kennedy Train-Wreck"
Roger Kimball reads Peter Collier’s paper on oft-overlooked unsavory details of the Kennedys' lives. Much of the paper is drawn from Collier’s book, coauthored with David Horowitz, The Kennedys: An American Drama.