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Notebook

January 2006

The artificial gravity of n+1

by Stefan Beck

On the new "cultural journal" n+1.

In wartime Britain, an oil-rationing poster asked: IS YOUR JOURNEY REALLY NECESSARY? Of the four young men who founded the magazine n+1, I have to ask: is your journal really necessary? It may be in the public interest to save ink for a worthier cause.

Well, “journal” may not be quite the right word. N+1, which debuted in Fall 2004 and is published twice a year, does look like a journal. It’s very close to the trim size of the magazine you’re holding now; like The New Criterion, it’s text-heavy, though it includes with every piece a black and white illustration. The three issues published thus far each run to nearly 200 pages.

But none of this makes n+1 a journal. Cahiers du jour might be the appropriate term for what is, as of this writing, the latest overhyped, must-have accessory of the self-styled “smart set.&r ...

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Stefan Beck is a writer living in Hudson, New York. He has contributed on fiction and other subjects to The Wall Street Journal, The Weekly Standard, and elsewhere.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 24 January 2006, on page 77

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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