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Features

December 2013

The overexposed museum

by Eric Gibson

Camera technology and the iPhone are changing the museum experience


Visitors take photos at MOMA; image Brian Kelly

For some time, art museums have been expending considerable amounts of energy and other resources on a broad campaign of public engagement designed to establish a stronger bond between themselves and the public, and thus cement the museum’s place as an essential—even indispensable—component of public life. Social media promotes their programs and addresses the public in other ways, “crowdsourcing” guides them in their acquisition and exhibition decisions, and “crowdfunding” helps pay for them. All manner of events and programs are put on in hopes of making the museum an appealing, even hip destination. Last year, one institution—the St ...

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Eric Gibson is the Leisure & Arts Features Editor of The Wall Street Journal.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 32 December 2013, on page 19

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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The Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity
On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism.
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