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Features

November 2013

What Dido did, Satan saw & O’Keeffe painted

by Mark Bauerlein

How the humanities can come out on top in the education debate


Pierre-Narcisse Guérin,
Aeneas tells Dido the misfortunes of the Trojan city, 1815  

In April 1981, The New York Times Book Review published an essay by the literary theorist Geoffrey Hartman that proposed a whole different model of academic criticism. Whereas traditional criticism served the primary text, aiming to clarify, elucidate, and otherwise expound on the original, Hartman argued that “new kinds of commentary” possess an “expressive force” and mark an “inventive feat, a ‘creative’ rather than a definit ...

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Mark Bauerlein is a professor of English at Emory University.


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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 32 November 2013, on page 4

Copyright © 2014 The New Criterion | www.newcriterion.com

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Webcasts

The Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity
On May 5, 2014, The New Criterion and PJ Media presented the second Walter Duranty Prize for Journalistic Mendacity. The award is given to highlight egregious examples of dishonest reporting. Also awarded this year was the Rather, a new award for lifetime achievement in mendacious journalism.
The Duranty Prize is named after Walter Duranty, the New York Times Moscow corresponded in the 1920s and 1930s who whitewashed Joseph Stalin’s forced starvation of the Ukrainians (the Holodomor) and many other aspects of Soviet oppression. Duranty was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1932 for his efforts. It has never been revoked.
Audio copyright Ed Driscoll, www.eddriscoll.com.


Introduction to The Kennedy Phenomenon
Roger Kimball introduces The Kennedy Phenomenon, a conference presented by The New Criterion on Tuesday, November 19.


The Kennedy Phenomenon: "Watching the Kennedy Train-Wreck"
Roger Kimball reads Peter Collier’s paper on oft-overlooked unsavory details of the Kennedys' lives. Much of the paper is drawn from Collier’s book, coauthored with David Horowitz, The Kennedys: An American Drama.