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The New Criterion

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October 2009

Yale & the Danish Cartoons

by Sarah Ruden

To the Editors:

With reference to “Yale & Danish Cartoons” (“Notes & Comments,” September 2009), I believe that some expression of solidarity on the part of other Yale Press authors like myself is essential. It was just too outrageous that the Yale and Yale University Press administrations cut the images from Jytte Klausen's book The Cartoons that Shook the World—a book about images and a dispassionate, useful book that could be objectionable only to radical Islam.

For my own part, I have already banned the Press from bidding on further books of mine. This is, first of all, a self-protective move. I don't think there's any coffee good enough that I'd enjoy being told over it that my finished, fully edited manuscript is going to be neutered because of a report I'm not allowed to see without swearing secrecy. Since I write about politics and religion, such a scene is a likely danger for me ...

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Sarah Ruden's translation of The Aeneid was published by Yale University Press earlier this year.

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This article originally appeared in The New Criterion, Volume 28 October 2009, on page 80

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