Sign in  |  Register

The New Criterion

The New Criterion is probably more consistently worth reading than any other magazine in English.
- The Times Literary Supplement

Weblog

 


Professor Donald Kagan to receive second "Edmund Burke Award"

by Eric C. Simpson

Posted: Apr 23, 2014 01:07 PM


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

NEW YORK, April 23, 2014—Professor Donald Kagan, Sterling Professor Emeritus of Classics at Yale University, will receive the second Edmund Burke Award for Service to Culture and Society at The New Criterion’s gala tonight in New York City. The event benefits The New Criterion, an influential monthly review of the arts and intellectual life, and the award, which was first presented to Dr. Henry Kissinger in 2012, gives homage to the inspiration provided by Edmund Burke, the eighteenth-century political philosopher.

Professor Kagan will be the guest of honor and will be delivering remarks on "Artists and Politics."

Read more


A Body Blow to Racial Discrimination

by Roger Kimball | from PJ Media

Posted: Apr 23, 2014 12:52 AM


Yes, you read it here: the Supreme Court of the United  States, in a 6-2 decision (Elena Kagan took no part in the case), upheld Michigan’s ban on racial discrimination in college admissions, overturning a lower court’s intervention to reverse a 2006 referendum in which Michigan voters decisively rejected the invidious process. You’ll be reading [...]

go to PJ Media


Carpeaux, public and private

by Eric Gibson

Posted: Apr 22, 2014 09:46 AM



Jean-Baptiste Carpeaux, Ugolino and His Sons, 1865–67; Saint-Béat marble, H. 77 3/4 x W. 59 x D. 43 1/2 in. (197.5 x 149.9 x 110.5 cm); The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Purchase, Josephine Bay Paul and C. Michael Paul Foundation Inc. Gift, Charles Ulrick and Josephine Bay Foundation Inc. Gift, and Fletcher Fund, 1967

Anyone studying art history in the 1960s and 1970s had it made clear to them in books, in articles, and in the classroom that the 300 years between the death of Michelangelo and the emergence of Rodin constituted a dark age as far as sculpture was concerned. If you were lucky, you would find a writer or professor willing to concede that that Bernini fellow might be worth a brief glance or two, but this was by no means assured. And the closer you got to the advent of modernism the darker the age became, so that the French sculptors of the nineteenth century were portrayed as green-eyed goblins worthy of some Gothic Last Judgment painting.

Read more



More on ‘President Asterisk’

by Roger Kimball | from PJ Media

Posted: Apr 21, 2014 04:55 PM


This morning, Instapundit dipped its cup into the growing current of stories about the lies and lawlessness that have characterized the Obama administration.  One story, “Barack Obama and the Politics of Lies,” is from the Washington Examiner and it ought to give anyone, Democrat or Republican,  pause. Citing the President’s recent “victory dance” over the [...]

go to PJ Media


Just what Doktor Strauss ordered: a soprano

by Jay Nordlinger

Posted: Apr 21, 2014 02:59 PM


Malin Byström in Act II of Arabella; photo: Marty Sohl/Metropolitan Opera

On Wednesday night, the Metropolitan Opera staged Arabella, one of the Strauss-Hofmannsthal works. The music is in the Rosenkavalier vein—but there is some Salome squirminess as well. The Strauss “veins” overlap, don’t they? The story is as screwy as that of any opera buffa, or at least I think so. It’s the kind of story in which a person may mistake the identity of the person with whom he is fornicating.

Read more


Samuel Johnson: Lawyer Manqué

by Stephen Miller

Posted: Apr 21, 2014 02:19 PM


According to conventional wisdom, most people would rather be known as a great writer than a great lawyer. Yet one of the most famous English writers regretted that he had not become a lawyer.  I’m referring to Samuel Johnson.  He told James Boswell that he became a writer because “I had not money to study law.”

In his twenties Johnson looked into the possibility of practicing law without a law degree, but he learned that it was impossible to do so. As a result, Boswell says, Johnson was “under the necessity of persevering in that course, into which he had been forced.”

Read more


More on “President Asterisk”

by Roger Kimball | from PJ Media

Posted: Apr 21, 2014 01:55 PM


This morning, Instapundit dipped its cup into the growing current of stories about the lies and lawlessness that have characterized the Obama administration.  One story, “Barack Obama and the Politics of Lies,” is from the Washington Examiner and it ought to give anyone, Democrat or Republican,  pause. Citing the President’s recent “victory dance” over the [...]

go to PJ Media


Learning can be fun, or history class as a game of hunt-the-Nazi

by James Bowman

Posted: Apr 18, 2014 10:26 AM


In the current issue of The New Criterion I write en passant about the “Common Core” curriculum in history which the educational establishment has been so terrifyingly successful in imposing on America’s school-children. Remarkably, there is no body of knowledge attached to the history standards. History, along with “social studies,” is itself tellingly subsumed under “English language arts” and is to the authors entirely a matter of analyzing and interpreting “texts.” The reason is of course that history is no longer to be regarded as transparent — stories, facts and dates to be learned like the multiplication table or spelling rules. The facts are now thought to be subsidiary to the true story, knowledge of which requires a certain interpretive subtlety on the part of the student. “History” now consists, according to the Common Core, of the skills necessary for the extraction of this hidden truth from the welter of mere facts.

Read more


Colby College sacks the stacks

by Jordan Graff

Posted: Apr 17, 2014 02:19 PM



Miller Library at Colby College | via

At Colby College, students and professors are protesting the school’s decision to remove 170,000 books from the campus library.  The books, which are being shipped to an off-campus storage facility, were removed as part of a two-phase renovation of Colby’s Miller Library.  The renovation, which cost the school $8.7 million, was designed to create more space in the library—the school claims it will add 150 seats—as well as to reflect the increasingly digitized nature of the library’s resources.  Some students and professors, however, are unhappy that their library’s on-campus collection is now smaller by 170,000 books.  A group of professors submitted three different petitions protesting the removal and a student-led petition has received seventy-six signatures.  Speaking for the opposition, Rob Weisbrot, a history professor at Colby, said, “While we laud the impressive advances in digitizing resources, these should supplement, not substitute, for keeping physical texts in the main library building.”  As it stands, Colby has removed nearly half of its collection from the main library building, leaving the students and faculty with a facility that, to quote Colby’s student newspaper, more closely resembles an “airplane hanger than a library.” 

Read more


The New Criterion

About ArmaVirumque

 

( AHR-mah wih-ROOM-kweh)

 

In the Aeneid, the Roman poet Virgil sang of "arms and a man" (Arma virumque cano). Month in and month out, The New Criterion expounds with great clarity and wit on the art, culture, and political controversies of our times. With postings of reviews, essays, links, recs, and news, Armavirumque seeks to continue this mission in accordance with the timetable of the digital age.

 

Follow us on Twitter:


 

Shortcut

www.armavirumque.org

 

To contact The New Criterion by email, write to:

  Contact

 

Subscribe to our newsletter!

* indicates required