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The favor of a link

by Jay Nordlinger

Posted: Sep 17, 2014 11:25 AM


Grand Schubertiade with Oliver Widmer; via Salzburger Festspiele / Silvia Lelli

In my Salzburg chronicle, I discuss a Schubertiade, held one evening at the Mozarteum. The program offered a slew of songs, some of them well-known, some of them hardly known at all. One song was “Ständchen” (“Serenade”), D. 920. This is not to be confused with Schubert’s very famous serenade, which is from Schwanengesang, D. 957. That serenade has not only been sung from time immemorial, it has been played on many instruments, in transcriptions.

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Seeing is believing

by Jay Nordlinger

Posted: Sep 16, 2014 12:09 PM


Julia Klieter as Emma, via Salzburger Festspiele / Monika Rittershaus

My forthcoming chronicle for the magazine is a Salzburg chronicle. In it, I discuss the festival’s production of Fierrabras, an opera by Schubert. The stage director for this production was Peter Stein, the veteran German. Some people knocked it for its “literalism,” among other things. Here on the blog, I would like to make a few comments about literalism—realism?—in opera.

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Speech, glorious speech: Yale Edition

by Christine Emba

Posted: Sep 15, 2014 02:14 PM


 

At 7:00 pm this evening, Ayaan Hirsi Ali is scheduled to present a lecture on the “Clash of Civilizations: Islam and the West” at Yale University as part of the William F. Buckley, Jr. Program’s speaker series. We say scheduled, of course, because of the circumstances surrounding the event.

Hirsi Ali is a Somali-born activist, writer, and politician; a former Muslim known for her women’s rights advocacy and critical remarks about Islam. She has served in the Dutch parliament, received awards for her moral courage, commitment to democracy and support of free speech, and was ranked by Time magazine as one of the 100 most influential people in the world under the category of "Leaders and Revolutionaries." Nevertheless, Yale’s Muslim Students Association (MSA)  has described her statements and positions as “hate speech,” “libel,” and “slander” worthy of condemnation. They feel “disrespected” by her very invitation to Yale’s campus. The group has asked for Hirsi Ali’s invitation to be rescinded,  for her to be prohibited from speaking about Islam, or for the addition of a second speaker with more credentials to provide a “more balanced” talk.  

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In Case You Missed It

by Christine Emba

Posted: Sep 12, 2014 01:04 PM


Raphael, "The Deposition" (1507), oil on wood. Now warped for lack of air-conditioning


Recent links of interest:

Michelangelo's Vision Was Greater Even Than Shakespeare's
"Michelangelo did more than anyone else to create the idea of the artist as a solitary, divinely inspired individual, answerable to no one and nothing except his talent."

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In Case You Missed It

by Christine Emba

Posted: Sep 05, 2014 02:27 PM


Site of the Battle of the Somme, today. Photo by Michael St. Maur Sheil, via Smithsonian.com


Recent links of interest:

The Great Architect Rebellion of 2014
At the Venice Biennale, visitors find their notions of modernism upended. 

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Evolution of the Obama Doctrine

by Roger Kimball | from PJ Media

Posted: Aug 31, 2014 02:50 PM


The “Obama Doctrine”: what do you suppose that might be? The goal of fundamentally transforming the United States of  America stands in the background, you can be sure of that. But  now, 6 years into the program, we can see an arc of development, an evolution (or devolution). There are many metrics that can be […]

go to PJ Media


In Case You Missed It

by Christine Emba

Posted: Aug 29, 2014 12:02 PM


The September issue has arrived! Our thirty-third season brings new articles, new poetry, and new events – we hope you'll join us.

 

Recent links of interest:

Detroit Mum on Proposal to Use Its Art as Collateral
A recent appraisal finds that the Detroit Institute of Arts collection is worth significantly more than previously assumed. Too much, perhaps, for it to avoid creditors' claims... 

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Advice for the Governor from Frank Sinatra

by James Bowman

Posted: Aug 27, 2014 11:45 AM


“The law supposes that your wife acts under your direction.”

When at the end of Oliver Twist, Mr. Bumble the Beadle is informed of what was formerly known as the Principle of Coverture under English Common Law, he replied in words that have echoed down the years since his own time: “If the law supposes that,” said the Beadle, “the law is a ass — a idiot. If that’s the eye of the law, the law is a bachelor; and the worst I wish the law is that his eye may be opened by experience — by experience.” The Principle of Coverture was abolished in England by the Married Women’s Property Act of 1882 and by various states in the US beginning in the 1830s. Interestingly, Virginia considered and rejected legislation to the same effect in the 1840s and only got around to getting rid of coverture after the Civil War. Some of my fellow Virginians may be wishing they’d left things as they were. 

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About ArmaVirumque

 

( AHR-mah wih-ROOM-kweh)

 

In the Aeneid, the Roman poet Virgil sang of "arms and a man" (Arma virumque cano). Month in and month out, The New Criterion expounds with great clarity and wit on the art, culture, and political controversies of our times. With postings of reviews, essays, links, recs, and news, Armavirumque seeks to continue this mission in accordance with the timetable of the digital age.

 

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