Since our first issue, we have striven to remain on the front line of the battle for culture, defending the values that define our civilization. This season marks thirty-five years of our publication, and, with it, thirty-five volumes of continued readership by an audience quite unlike any other.

It is with that in mind that I once again write to you seeking help in this endeavor. Our presses, as much as we might like them to, do not operate on sheer force of will alone. Only a community committed to our cause can keep them printing the criticism that fortifies our cultural intellect. This has always been our mission, and today I hope you will help us continue to carry our banner.

And carrying that banner this year has been, I’m sure you’ll agree, especially fascinating. We have explored “The perils & promises of populism” with intelligent analysis from contributors such as George Nash, Barry Strauss, and Daniel Hannan. We will continue to publish articles that warrant both your time and critical reflection from James Piereson, Andrew C. McCarthy, Fred Siegel, and other contributors. But in order for us to continue seeking out compelling criticism that examines our cultural well-being and defines the great lines upon which our civilization is drawn, we ultimately rely on our readers for their support.

I hope that you, like all of us at The New Criterion, recognize how critical it is for an institution such as ours to work for the preservation of what Matthew Arnold famously referred to as “the best that has been thought and said in the world.” This is our cause. We hope you will make it your own as well.

And if you’re not completely convinced of the merit of this request, please read my full letter to readers like yourself on why the continued publication of our monthly journal is more imperative than ever.

Yours Faithfully,

 


Roger Kimball, Editor & Publisher
 

A Message from the Editors

Our past successes are owed to our greatest ambassadors: our readers. Our future rests on your support, as The New Criterion Editor Roger Kimball explains. Will you help us continue to bring our incisive review of the arts and culture to the next generation of readers?