. . . the playhouse . . . was little more than a shell. . . . Through the planks of its floor at high tide the bay could be seen and heard and smelled. Under Cook’s direction an ingenious stage was built. Only ten by twelve feet, it was sectional and mobile and could be slid backward onto the end of the wharf through the two wide doors at the rear of the theater, to provide an effect of distance. Those doors, through which fishermen had once hurled their catch, could be flung apart to expose the most realistic sea backdrop any theater ever had. . . .
—description of the Provincetown Players’ Wharf Theater from Arthur and Barbara Gelb’s biography of Eugene O’Neill

Certainly, one of the infallible signs that Coarse Drama is going on is the fact that the traditional roles of actor and audience are reversed. The actor is being himself while the audience are playing a part. . . .
—from Michael Green’s...

 
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