In his long and celebrated literary career— which I began to examine in the last issue of The New Criterion—Graham Greene has written some three dozen novels, “entertainments,” plays, essays, memoirs, short-story collections, and travel books.[1] But it is those books which, for want of a better term, we may call his Catholic novels (The Power and the Glory, The Heart of the Matter, The End of the Affair, and A Burnt-Out Case) and his later political novels (The Quiet American, The Comedians, The Honorary Consul, and The Human Factor) that are generally acknowledged, for better or worse, to comprise the nucleus of his oeuvre. Though there are other works by Greene that have scattered and enthusiastic support, critics who speak of Greene’s literary mastery tend almost exclusively to...

 
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