Writing about a Greek marble head in the Boston Museum of Fine Arts seen during his 1904-5 visit to the States, Henry James said it had been well worth crossing the Atlantic to see the genius of ancient Greece in American light. “[T]o the raffiné of almost any other clime,” he wrote, “I should say … that he has not seen a fine Greek thing till he has seen it in America.” In the daylight-flooded, circular upper gallery of the Lehman wing of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, visitors to an exhibition of forty-eight original Greek marbles and bronzes from the sixth to early fourth centuries B.C. can judge for themselves the aptness of such a notion today. “The Greek Miracle: Classical Sculpture from the Dawn of Democracy”[1] is the first major loan exhibition of Greek antiquities in New York since “The Search for...

 
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