Maybe it’s the Guggenheim or maybe it’s me, but “Art of Another Kind: International Abstraction and the Guggenheim, 1949–1960” seems a bore. “Seems” is used here as a critical hedge: The exhibition includes an inescapable array of artists and some stunning works. But the problem—or part of the problem—is how many of the works aren’t stunning, but merely diverting or symptomatic of the time. “Art of Another Kind”isn’t intended to be a definitive retrospective of an era—roughly speaking, the decade in which Abstract Expressionism achieved Grand Manner status. The curatorial focus, rather, is on one institution’s accounting of the avant-garde and, as such, is both defined and limited by the museum’s...

 
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